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Grade 1, Book 5
Grade 1, Book 5
Unit 2: Many Paths
 
The Story of the Blue Bird
by Tomek Bogacki
 

Cross Curricular  
Geography: Central and South America  
Cross Curricular
From the Student Web Page
Bird Hunt
Connect to this link:
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/Dictionary.html


  1. Click on the letter B.
  2. Find a bird.
  3. Draw a picture of the bird.
  4. Label the name of the bird.
  5. Label two parts of the bird.
About the Site

This site contains a picture dictionary for K-1 students. Within each letter, a variety of pictures from animals to clothing are given to represent each letter.

Lesson Objectives

  • Students will name identify a bird.

  • Students will draw a bird.

  • Students will label parts of a bird

Suggested Additional Activities

  • Have students find birds from 3 other letters of the alphabet. Have students draw a picture of their favorite bird found.

  • Assign each student a letter of the alphabet to find a bird on the internet. Have them draw a picture on a piece of blank paper and label with name of bird. Bind all papers to make a class picture dictionary.

From the Student Web Page
Native Songbirds in Color and Sound
Connect to this link:
http://www.naturesound.com/birds/birds.html


  1. Click American Robin.
  2. Read about the robin.
  3. Click the sound box to listen to a robin.
  4. Close the window.
  5. Look at and listen to more birds.
About the Site

Twelve photographs of songbirds are featured in this online album that also provides RealAudio˝ sound clips of each species' song. Click thumbnail pictures to display larger pictures with brief information about each bird. Photographer Lang Elliot publishes the site.

What to Do

  1. Ask children to list different types of birds they know.

  2. Help them navigate the Web site as suggested. Read the text aloud.

  3. Have them to create an in-class gallery of bird pictures.


Find Out More  
Birds as Pets  
Find Out More
From the Student Web Page
Hatching Emus
Connect to this link:
http://www.siec.k12.in.us/~west/proj/emu/


  1. Read about this class project.
  2. Click picture gallery.
  3. Click the first picture to make it larger.
  4. Click the Back arrow. Then click and study the next 5 pictures to learn more.
  5. Then click Quiz. How much do you know about emus?
About the Site

Invite children to tour this Web site where they can learn about emus from a second grade class that incubated and hatched emu eggs. At the picture gallery, children will be able to peek into the process, see the emus hatching, and meet the class as they play with the four emu babies. Children will enjoy the online, multiple-choice quiz written and illustrated by the class. The quiz and its associated photos are worthwhile, even if you need to read the questions for children. West Loogootee Elementary School in Indiana provides the site.

What to Do

  1. Ask children if they know what an emu is. You may want to have a nature book available to show a photo.

  2. Read the text that accompanies the photos aloud to the children. Encourage children to click the thumbnails for a larger view, and then click the Back arrow.

  3. Guide children through the online quiz. Suggest that they click the drawings to make them larger.

  4. You may wish to have children draw an emu and write one fact about it.

From the Student Web Page
King Crayon
Connect to this link:
http://www.kingcrayon.com/king.htm


  1. Click His Majesty. Look at the pictures of King Crayon and his cage.
  2. Click Home Page. Then click King's Court.
  3. Click the photos of the different birds to get a closer look.
  4. Learn about the different kinds of pet birds that belong to the owner.
About the Site

Bird lover Tony Sopranzi sponsors this whimsical site devoted to his large group of pet birds. Children will enjoy looking at the different colored birds. The link labeled Proclamation contains a great deal of easy to understand information about breeds and bird care. You may want to preview the site to determine which information will be most interesting to children.

What to Do

  1. Discuss with children why someone might name a bird King Crayon.

  2. Look at the other birds and their living areas.

  3. Discuss the items that students see in the cages that birds need.

  4. If time permits, discuss the care and feeding information given at the site.


Leveled Books  
Birds  
Leveled Books
From the Student Web Page
Bird Songs
Connect to this link:
http://www.math.sunysb.edu/~tony/birds/


  1. Click a bird. Listen to bird sounds.
  2. Explore more birds and their songs.
  3. Describe the difference between two bird sounds.
About the Site

Tony Phillips, a professor in the Mathematics Department at the Stony Brook branch of the State University of New York, provides this Web site that features songs and calls by many New York State birds. Here children can view detailed drawings, learn the common and scientific names of the birds, and listen to audio clips of several calls from each species.

What to Do

  1. Tell children that each bird species has its own sounds. Explain further that just as we use different voices, birds use different calls for different circumstances.

  2. Help children navigate the site if necessary. To hear the birds, make sure children click each picture and not its label.

  3. Have them describe the differences between the sounds.

  4. You may want to have children select, draw, and label one of the birds. Create a classroom bird directory.

From the Student Web Page
The Raptor Center: A Gallery of Pictures
Connect to this link:
http://www.raptorcentre.co.uk/Raptor_Gallery.htm


  1. Click a picture to meet a bird. Scroll over the picture. You might hear the bird's call.
  2. Click Back to the Gallery.
  3. Meet all of the birds.
  4. Which birds would you find where you live?
About the Site

The Raptor Centre, located in Kent, England, publishes this Web site that shows excellent close-up photographs of various birds of prey in all stages of life. Each photograph is accompanied by a description and history of the bird. Tell children that raptors are birds of prey, or birds that hunt small animals for food. The center, a sanctuary for birds of prey, works to rescue injured birds and to promote the continued existence of these species. Links to other birds of prey sites are also available. You may want to point out the alternate British spelling for the word center.

What to Do

  1. Have children look at each photograph on the page.

  2. Help them navigate to enlarge and hear bird sounds. Not every picture has a bird sound.

  3. Ask them to compare birds to other objects in pictures to understand how large some of them are.